Palmer Lake Historical Society
Serving the Tri-Lakes/Palmer Divide Since 1956
P.O. Box 662, Palmer Lake, CO 80133

 

Click here to download PLHS membership brochure
Click to view this PLHS brochure in pdf format

Dan's History Snippets
Contributed by Dan Edwards

Dan has gleaned news snippets from various newspapers that have now been digitized. The newspapers researched reach back to the late 1800’s. All spellings, punctuation, and phrasing are taken verbatim from the source material.

From the Gazette

Sunday about 11 a.m. the residence and harness shop of L.M. McFarland & Son was discovered to be on fire, and at one o’clock was entirely consumed. The flames soon communicated to the Delmonico restaurant, from there to Husted Bros.’ feed store, and in less than two hours all were burned to the ground. By vigorous work the blaze was confined to the buildings mentioned, although fully one-half the town was indirectly exposed. The hard fight was to save Dr. Bonnet’s residence and drug store on the west, the Dunshee block across the street south and Dennis Whalen’s blacksmith and wagon shop on the east. Water was poured on and wet blankets put on the roofs and sides of the buildings, still they were badly scorched, and the glass front of the Dunshee block was completely destroyed. The alarm of fire was given soon after service began at the church, and the whole congregation, including the minister, came down and worked with a will so that all the contents of the restaurant and most of the stock in the feed store were saved.

The ladies in the town deserve special mention. They worked for hours carrying water. Fully half the town was at Palmer Lake attending the Firemen’s picnic when the fire broke out. Agent Warren of the Santa Fe telegraphed to Palmer Lake for help. The Santa Fe company sent a special with the Colorado Springs Hook and Ladder company, but the buildings were all consumed before they arrived. About 7 o’clock the barn of W.B. Walker was discovered to be on fire, but the prompt assistance of the citizens with their pails of water put the fire out before any damage was done.

It is estimated the loss will reach thirty-five hundred dollars. The Walker building in which was situated the restaurant and feed store estimated a loss of $1200; no insurance. L.M. McFarland, loss $1000; insurance on building and stock, $700. Husted Bros. on stock, $200; no insurance. The Dunshee block and Dr. Bonnet’s building about $1100.

From the Rocky Mountain News

Our iron spring still continues to attract attention.

The farmer’s heart rejoices—rain has come and plenty of it, and everything looks thriving once more. Potatoes are above par.

W.E. Killen, pump repairer for the Denver & Rio Grande railway, has recently arrived in town with his family and sister.

Mr. J.C. Agnew recently climbed to the top of Cathedral rock—the only man who has ever performed the feat—and he does not desire to do it again.

Going twenty miles to get a tooth pulled is not a very pleasant undertaking, especially when one is suffering untold agony. Yet Monument folk are compelled to do it, their town doctor not having received his instruments as yet.

There is a prospect of a tie war in view of the fact that the Denver & Rio Grande have issued instructions to their agents between Denver and Colorado Springs not to receive any ties for shipment for outside parties. It is well-known that the Denver & New Orleans railway have a large number of first-class ties awaiting shipment between these points, and interested parties are waiting to see what the end will be.

Our iron spring still continues to attract attention.

The farmer’s heart rejoices—rain has come and plenty of it, and everything looks thriving once more. Potatoes are above par.

W.E. Killen, pump repairer for the Denver & Rio Grande railway, has recently arrived in town with his family and sister.

Mr. J.C. Agnew recently climbed to the top of Cathedral rock—the only man who has ever performed the feat—and he does not desire to do it again.

Going twenty miles to get a tooth pulled is not a very pleasant undertaking, especially when one is suffering untold agony. Yet Monument folk are compelled to do it, their town doctor not having received his instruments as yet.

There is a prospect of a tie war in view of the fact that the Denver & Rio Grande have issued instructions to their agents between Denver and Colorado Springs not to receive any ties for shipment for outside parties. It is well-known that the Denver & New Orleans railway have a large number of first-class ties awaiting shipment between these points, and interested parties are waiting to see what the end will be.

If you would like to learn more about Tri-Lakes history, the Palmer Lake Historical Society, or the Lucretia Vaile Museum, please e-mail us at PLHS@PalmerDivideHistory.org.